anthroposophicalbehaviour

bringing forward Waldorf/Steiner issues

who gets hurt by anthroposophy?

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I was browsing through Waldorf Watch when I came across this rather sad article “Who gets hurt?” Having been married to a graduate of the Christchurch steiner system I’d have to say that my ex partner was extremely and irrevocably damaged by their education (I use the word advisedly). As an adult the task of recovering from anthroposophical beliefs has been and still is a life spoiling process. Not confident, unable to maintain relationships, lacking the will they are being told will be developed. Stuck in a paradigm that is separatist and racist. Something needs to be done about this aryan system being allowed to exist in Aotearoa NZ. It is anathema to our way of life. It goes against the concepts of freedom my grandparents and uncles went to war over. It not only hurts the children who go through that system, but it impacts on their non-anthroposophical friends, lovers, and partners. It is indeed a danger to all of those involved in their community as well as those who come into contact with them.

“It took me many long, weary years to rid myself of the occultism that Waldorf slipped into my consciousness. Here is how things stood for me on the day of my graduation from the 12th grade at our Waldorf school. [I will quote now from my classic memoir, “I Went to Waldorf”]:

“During my eleven years at Waldorf, I stood quite close to the fire, and I was drawn to its warmth — yet I pulled back. My nearest approach to full allegiance came during the excitement and nostalgia of graduation day. On that June morning, I considered myself profoundly religious (although I could not list the Ten Commandments nor quote more than a few short Bible verses). I thrilled to the knowledge that the world is more spirit than physics, more ideal than actual. I was vain, moralistic, priggish, innocent, shy, racially bigoted, and (confusingly, for a head-honcho student) utterly lacking in self-confidence. I was judgmental yet uncertain. I had no patience with science and its shallow half-truths. I prized imagination over intellect, sensibility over sense. I was right about everything, always — don’t even ask. (Please, don’t ask.) I had only superficial knowledge of the US economy and the major political issues in the wide world — and I didn’t care. Everything that I saw outside the school seemed to be beneath me. I was directionless. I had no career ambitions, no academic focus, no marketable skills. I had precious few social skills. I longed for a beauteous, buxom Aryan mate. (Few real girls approximated my fantasy. Marilyn, where are you? I never dated much.) I half-yearned for easeful death, or better yet a crusade, or salvation. I dreamed of writing a book titled GOD that would reconcile all the world’s religions. I dreamed of becoming President of the United States. I dreamed of performing — I wasn’t sure what — something — a titanic, stupendous something. But I had no intention of lifting a finger. I was on hold, waiting… In other words, I had been brainwashed, with a thoroughness and intensity I could not fathom. (Call me the Manchurian Schoolboy.) And, I should add, I was — without quite realizing it — deeply unhappy. Thank God, I was deeply unhappy. As the realization of my dejection slowly dawned on me during the following years, I became motivated to try to comprehend my condition and then to repair it. Even so, only gradually was I able to fight my way down from the fog in which (metaphorically speaking: only a metaphor) I levitated and at long last find my footing in reality. It took me more than twenty years to fully deprogram myself.”  Read more from Waldorf Watch here.

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