anthroposophicalbehaviour

bringing forward Waldorf/Steiner issues

Archive for the ‘Waldorf’ Category

some research

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One wonders if all the authors of this unoriginal document are attached to the waldorf / steiner movement in some way?

The learning of one to one matching of number words eg; one (the word) to one concrete object, say a block of some kind, is not new and common in the teaching of numeracy. There’s nothing “esoteric” or hidden about this knowledge and I am affronted by this rather lame attempt to make numeracy some kind of “spiritual science” by the waldorf / steiner community. Rhythmical teaching strategies have always been a part of “State Teaching” in Aotearoa NZ. We know it helps rote learning of basic facts but does little to teach that the formula (say 3 x 4 = 12)actually means that there are 3 groups of 4 objects and when I join them together, I end up with 12 objects. Repeated addition is very useful. Of course the child rarely comes to their first class knowing this concept and it takes some time to learn. But it is not “esoteric” or “magical” in any way. Contrary to anthroposophical opinion, it is not only for the initiated. See what waldorf answers has to say here.

research

steiner anthropocentric paranoia

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Living in ahrimanic times From Wellspring 

ahrimanic anthropop paranoia

Heads firmly in the sand, blocking themselves off from the rest of the world, telling themselves how informed and full of love they are. In reality, they are a frightened, paranoid, judgemental, unforgiving, secretive, ignorant, racist, idiotic bunch of looney toons who believe in planet nibura (x) and the moon man. Everything, from education to science to spirituality is seriously misinformed and basically incorrect. How anyone in the 21st century could fall for this cult is a real surprise to me. Sadly, I guess there’s something in the eurocentric aryan mindset that just won’t let them be.

practising what is preached……

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News – Waldorf Watch

“Anthroposophists generally practise what they preach … but only up to a point. We certainly have no difficulty in rejecting most of the world’s recognized authorities, along with the orthodoxies of politics, economics, medicine, science, art, agriculture and education that they represent — except when they just happen to fit in with something that we are pushing [there is definitely a love of money that doesn’t fit. Ever parked outside the ecologically minded steiner school? It’s hard to get round all the SUV’s]. As a group we believe that we have access to knowledge that puts us in a superior position, [I have witnessed this ism. It is no different from the “born again.” Our way or no way] and the tendency to let this feeling of superiority show is one of the most off-putting features of the anthroposophical personality.” — Waldorf teacher Keith Francis. [See “Ex-Teacher 9”.] What is “the anthroposophical personality”? To generalize: There is a layer of sweetness. [however it is very thin] Anthroposophists believe in angels and fairies and living spirits in the heavens and earth [just like “born agains have their beliefs]. But there is also smugness, a sense of superiority [a definite fall down off the pedestal] — Anthroposophists think they know more than anyone else about almost everything (and what they don’t know isn’t worth knowing). There are traces of pseudo-intellectualism: Anthroposophy is a complex system; adherents read brain-jarring tomes by Rudolf Steiner and others, and they develop intricate rationalizations to support what they read. There is inflexibility. Anthroposophy is The Truth, and anyone who assails it is probably demonic, while anyone who leaves the fold cult is beneath notice, having chosen The False. [Some point of difference] There is a countercultural inclination, a certain rebelliousness: Authorities are distrusted while the inviolable authority of the Self [Who was it that said, “Do what thou wilt.”] is affirmed. Overall, the Anthroposophical personality is defined by delusion. Believing that the heart is truer than the brain, Anthroposophists think that what they feel must be true. Believing in clairvoyance or “higher consciousness,” Anthroposophists think that what they sense must be true. And thus rationality withers. Believing only what they wish to believe, Anthroposophists cut themselves off more and more from reality, [sadly I have witnessed this consequence] they become more and more remote, and more and more defensive (because, despite their determined efforts, a shadow of doubt haunts the Anthroposophical night).

Grandmother’s Healing Haka

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www.ch.steiner.school.nz/0-newsletter-box/current.pdf

I am puzzled that there are people who are trying to make money out of my culture who have european names. How does one come from Switzerland and gain the right to hold a Maori healing ceremony on Te Waka a Maui. Uekaha should know better. Tikanga Maori is neither anthroposophic nor is it steiner based custom. Just another way for people to make money from our culture. I’m sure they’ve justified it to themselves, but this blatant dilution of my culture by an aryan – centric philosophy steeped in aryan superiority is immoral.

Grandmother’s Healing Haka For the first time this Haka will be taught in the South Island a tour school by Ojasvin Kingi and his wife Iris from Switzerland. Both have been teaching the Haka internationally over the last years.It will take place on Friday 2 Dec 7.30 – 10.30pm Saturday 3 Dec 9.30 – 6pm Cost: $80 Also, a Healing for the Land Ritual will be offered and will take place after a shared dinner on Saturday evening at Brighton Beach.  Please consider this a very special opportunity and join us for those days (we need at least 16 people).  If interested you can google Grandmother’s HealingHaka.Phone Simoneor Uekaha on 3846081or021820 182 (Simone), 021 067 2096 (Uekaha).  Closer to the time, pamphlets and more detailed information will be shared.



Steiner School Recognition and Accreditation « UK Anthroposophy

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Free Schools(5a) – Steiner School Recognition and Accreditation « UK Anthroposophy.

This article from UK Anthroposophy is sure worth a read. The will be more parts to the post which I will post on to make sure it’s read in Aotearoa NZ.

accepting anthroposophy

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News – Waldorf Watch

Waldorf teachers must accept or, at an absolute minimum, make peace with the doctrines of Anthroposophy. Waldorf schools prefer to hire only committed followers of Rudolf Steiner, but sometimes they must hire nonbelievers, if only temporarily. This can cause problems both for the schools and for the new hires. Addressing new and aspiring Waldorf teachers, Waldorf teacher Keith Francis writes, “[Y]ou also have to come to terms with reincarnation, karma, the details of the life between death and rebirth and the work of the hierarchies [i.e., ranks of gods] in the evolution of the world and the human being. This is not all. Perhaps the most difficult thing is that you get the impression that anthroposophists think of Christ as a great spiritual being [i.e., He is just one of many gods]. That indefinite article on its own may be enough to give you the feeling that anthroposophy is not for you. The continual references to the members of the hierarchies as Gods do not help.” — Keith Francis, THE EDUCATION OF A WALDORF TEACHER (iUniverse, 2004), p. 183. [See “Ex-Teacher 9”.] [For information about the Waldorf worldview, see The Brief Waldorf / Steiner Encyclopedia. For the context of the Waldorf worldview — the broad fields of occultism, mysticism, and the paranormal — see The Semi-Steiner Dictionary. For previous notable quotes, see “Quotes”. For previous “news,” see the “News Archive”.]

what do they teach my youngest at Christchurch steiner?

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What is the curriculum at a Waldorf school like? (this from waldorf answersmy thoughts are in red)

The Waldorf curriculum is designed to be responsive to the various phases of a child’s development. (my experience is that they, the Christchurch steiner school, try to fit the children into their 7 year cycles regardless of where they’re actually at) The relationship between student and teacher is, likewise, recognized to be both crucial and changing throughout the course of childhood and early adolescence. (my step-daughter’s teacher is not qualified to teach at Primary Grade 1, he studied bio-dynamic farming and anthroposophy. That does not make him a teacher, he is baby sitting and doesn’t know what to do). 

The main subjects, such as history, language arts, science and mathematics are, as mentioned, taught in main lesson blocks of two to three hours per day, with each block lasting from three to five weeks. (2 or 3 hour blocks is not a useful block of time for a Grade one student. It is well known that they do not have the concentration span for that. So far it has failed my 3 step-children).

The total Waldorf curriculum has been likened to an ascending spiral: subjects are revisited several times, but each new exposure affords greater depth and new insights into the subject at hand. (this is a common way to teach in state schools. The difference is that state schools pre-test children so the don’t go over things the children already know which is boring, a common complaint. Then state schools post test to find out what the child has learned).

A typical Lower School curriculum would likely look something like the following:

Primary Grades 1 – 3

Pictorial introduction to the alphabet, writing, reading, spelling, poetry and drama.

Folk and fairy tales, fables, legends, Old Testament stories. (All eurocentric accept a very small nod towards Aotearoa-NZ’s own stories, myths, and legends. No depth unless it’s aryan gods and legends).

Numbers, basic mathematical processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

Nature stories, house building and gardening.

How is reading taught in a waldorf school?

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How is reading taught in a Waldorf school? Why do Waldorf students wait until 2nd grade to begin learning to read?

Waldorf education is deeply bound up with the oral tradition,(of Europe) typically beginning with the teacher telling the children fairy tales throughout kindergarten and first grade (All very Eurocentric which is inappropriate in Aotearoa NZ) The oral approach is used all through Waldorf education: mastery of oral communication is seen as being integral to all learning (they pay little heed to the oral traditions of our country).

Reading instruction, as such, is deferred. Instead, writing is taught first (nonsensical in the extreme). During the first grade year the children explore how our alphabet came about (German at Christchurch), discovering, as the ancients did, how each letter’s form evolved out of a pictograph. Writing thus evolves out of the children’s art, and their ability to read likewise evolves as a natural and, indeed, comparatively effortless stage of their mastery of language (my step-daughter needed private tuition).

So much for the natural and effortless way in which steiner schools teach children to read. You can read more here at waldorf answers.

who gets hurt by anthroposophy?

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I was browsing through Waldorf Watch when I came across this rather sad article “Who gets hurt?” Having been married to a graduate of the Christchurch steiner system I’d have to say that my ex partner was extremely and irrevocably damaged by their education (I use the word advisedly). As an adult the task of recovering from anthroposophical beliefs has been and still is a life spoiling process. Not confident, unable to maintain relationships, lacking the will they are being told will be developed. Stuck in a paradigm that is separatist and racist. Something needs to be done about this aryan system being allowed to exist in Aotearoa NZ. It is anathema to our way of life. It goes against the concepts of freedom my grandparents and uncles went to war over. It not only hurts the children who go through that system, but it impacts on their non-anthroposophical friends, lovers, and partners. It is indeed a danger to all of those involved in their community as well as those who come into contact with them.

“It took me many long, weary years to rid myself of the occultism that Waldorf slipped into my consciousness. Here is how things stood for me on the day of my graduation from the 12th grade at our Waldorf school. [I will quote now from my classic memoir, “I Went to Waldorf”]:

“During my eleven years at Waldorf, I stood quite close to the fire, and I was drawn to its warmth — yet I pulled back. My nearest approach to full allegiance came during the excitement and nostalgia of graduation day. On that June morning, I considered myself profoundly religious (although I could not list the Ten Commandments nor quote more than a few short Bible verses). I thrilled to the knowledge that the world is more spirit than physics, more ideal than actual. I was vain, moralistic, priggish, innocent, shy, racially bigoted, and (confusingly, for a head-honcho student) utterly lacking in self-confidence. I was judgmental yet uncertain. I had no patience with science and its shallow half-truths. I prized imagination over intellect, sensibility over sense. I was right about everything, always — don’t even ask. (Please, don’t ask.) I had only superficial knowledge of the US economy and the major political issues in the wide world — and I didn’t care. Everything that I saw outside the school seemed to be beneath me. I was directionless. I had no career ambitions, no academic focus, no marketable skills. I had precious few social skills. I longed for a beauteous, buxom Aryan mate. (Few real girls approximated my fantasy. Marilyn, where are you? I never dated much.) I half-yearned for easeful death, or better yet a crusade, or salvation. I dreamed of writing a book titled GOD that would reconcile all the world’s religions. I dreamed of becoming President of the United States. I dreamed of performing — I wasn’t sure what — something — a titanic, stupendous something. But I had no intention of lifting a finger. I was on hold, waiting… In other words, I had been brainwashed, with a thoroughness and intensity I could not fathom. (Call me the Manchurian Schoolboy.) And, I should add, I was — without quite realizing it — deeply unhappy. Thank God, I was deeply unhappy. As the realization of my dejection slowly dawned on me during the following years, I became motivated to try to comprehend my condition and then to repair it. Even so, only gradually was I able to fight my way down from the fog in which (metaphorically speaking: only a metaphor) I levitated and at long last find my footing in reality. It took me more than twenty years to fully deprogram myself.”  Read more from Waldorf Watch here.

religious apartheid through steiner

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My experience of the steiner community in Christchurch supports the idea that they are a separatist cult. This statement from steiner supports the same idea. Mind you I’m one of the undiscerning and I am a coloured person. Whilst that makes me strong, evidently it makes me stupid. In my opinion the paragraph below validates religious apartheid.

“[T]he process of relating to the public has a spiritual side to it … While many [Waldorf] schools are experiencing unparalleled growth, others suffer increasing overhead costs with the same number of students or even a decrease in enrollment. Tuition income is never sufficient to cover full operating and scholarship expenses … Fundraising activity has become a strenuous way of life for many Waldorf schools … [I]t may happen that a school slowly begins to isolate itself from the local community. It may see itself, and rightly so, as a cultural haven in a disturbingly hostile world … [S]ome institutions may not be able to maintain this posture for long unless there is a well-established, built-in community support system … The connections between the ‘inner’ and ‘outer’ work [of a school] are like the ever-changing surfaces of a lemniscate*: a mutually supportive modulation between inner and outer with each surface complementing the other.” — Werner Glas and Cornelius Pietzner, HANDLING PUBLIC RELATIONS – A Guide for Waldorf Schools and Other Organizations (Sunbridge College Press, 1984), pp. 3-6. Read the full article at Waldorf Watch here.