anthroposophicalbehaviour

bringing forward Waldorf/Steiner issues

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practising what is preached……

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News – Waldorf Watch

“Anthroposophists generally practise what they preach … but only up to a point. We certainly have no difficulty in rejecting most of the world’s recognized authorities, along with the orthodoxies of politics, economics, medicine, science, art, agriculture and education that they represent — except when they just happen to fit in with something that we are pushing [there is definitely a love of money that doesn’t fit. Ever parked outside the ecologically minded steiner school? It’s hard to get round all the SUV’s]. As a group we believe that we have access to knowledge that puts us in a superior position, [I have witnessed this ism. It is no different from the “born again.” Our way or no way] and the tendency to let this feeling of superiority show is one of the most off-putting features of the anthroposophical personality.” — Waldorf teacher Keith Francis. [See “Ex-Teacher 9”.] What is “the anthroposophical personality”? To generalize: There is a layer of sweetness. [however it is very thin] Anthroposophists believe in angels and fairies and living spirits in the heavens and earth [just like “born agains have their beliefs]. But there is also smugness, a sense of superiority [a definite fall down off the pedestal] — Anthroposophists think they know more than anyone else about almost everything (and what they don’t know isn’t worth knowing). There are traces of pseudo-intellectualism: Anthroposophy is a complex system; adherents read brain-jarring tomes by Rudolf Steiner and others, and they develop intricate rationalizations to support what they read. There is inflexibility. Anthroposophy is The Truth, and anyone who assails it is probably demonic, while anyone who leaves the fold cult is beneath notice, having chosen The False. [Some point of difference] There is a countercultural inclination, a certain rebelliousness: Authorities are distrusted while the inviolable authority of the Self [Who was it that said, “Do what thou wilt.”] is affirmed. Overall, the Anthroposophical personality is defined by delusion. Believing that the heart is truer than the brain, Anthroposophists think that what they feel must be true. Believing in clairvoyance or “higher consciousness,” Anthroposophists think that what they sense must be true. And thus rationality withers. Believing only what they wish to believe, Anthroposophists cut themselves off more and more from reality, [sadly I have witnessed this consequence] they become more and more remote, and more and more defensive (because, despite their determined efforts, a shadow of doubt haunts the Anthroposophical night).

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